Rongeur

a carefully curated library of horseshit
Recent Tweets @

sikssaapo-p:

"You are the goddang whitest person I’ve ever seen."

(via aetropos)

hana025:

Event- Hong Kong Rainbow Gala 2014

Bruno Bucciarati cn Hana

(via vinegardoppio)

chakrabot:

cosplayingwhileblack:

Character: Punk! Storm

Series: X-Men

Model: Jacqueline-Elizabeth Cottrell, under the name of Kurosune.
Photography:
Jamais Vu 
Outfit:
Marika of Kicka Custom Designs.

SUBMISSION

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhffffffffff

blackpaint20:

Shell wound of the wrist.

Medical Illustration by William Shultze, 1863.

(via timwhiskey)

elementarystan:

LA Times: Elementary deduces the painful truth at the heart of sobriety
Very few shows could pull off a homage to the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman without seeming exploitative, sensational or culturally carnivorous. Only one could do it in the middle of an episode dealing with a bunch of missing anthrax and Garret Dillahunt as a dairy farmer.
"Elementary" has its share of pivotal moments, but they are invariably underplayed, woven into crime-solving story lines that allow the larger narrative to emerge with surprising power. It may be the best portrait of recovery on television.
Sobriety is not the point of “Elementary”; the deductive powers and social ineptitude of its famous lead and his relationship with Watson are what drive the show.
But the addiction, at first obvious then oblique in Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories, has always been what made Sherlock Holmes a man rather than a machine; it’s what drew “Elementary” creator Rob Doherty to the character in the first place.
Hoffman’s death, Doherty said in an interview, seemed impossible to ignore because it allowed the writers to put Sherlock “in the position to ask some of the questions many people were asking … to make the point that addiction does not discriminate.”
"His relapsing doesn’t change a thing for you, not one single thing. You woke up today, you didn’t use drugs, just like yesterday. You know what you have to do tomorrow? Wake up and not use drugs. That is just how it is. That is how it’s going to be."

elementarystan:

LA Times: Elementary deduces the painful truth at the heart of sobriety

Very few shows could pull off a homage to the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman without seeming exploitative, sensational or culturally carnivorous. Only one could do it in the middle of an episode dealing with a bunch of missing anthrax and Garret Dillahunt as a dairy farmer.

"Elementary" has its share of pivotal moments, but they are invariably underplayed, woven into crime-solving story lines that allow the larger narrative to emerge with surprising power. It may be the best portrait of recovery on television.

Sobriety is not the point of “Elementary”; the deductive powers and social ineptitude of its famous lead and his relationship with Watson are what drive the show.

But the addiction, at first obvious then oblique in Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories, has always been what made Sherlock Holmes a man rather than a machine; it’s what drew “Elementary” creator Rob Doherty to the character in the first place.

Hoffman’s death, Doherty said in an interview, seemed impossible to ignore because it allowed the writers to put Sherlock “in the position to ask some of the questions many people were asking … to make the point that addiction does not discriminate.

"His relapsing doesn’t change a thing for you, not one single thing. You woke up today, you didn’t use drugs, just like yesterday. You know what you have to do tomorrow? Wake up and not use drugs. That is just how it is. That is how it’s going to be."

gessorly:

tyrror:

ruingaraf:

themarchrabbit:

Seriously, it kills me when I see people hold scientists up as pinnacles of logic and reason.

Because one time the professor I was interning for got punched in the face by another professor, because mine got the funding, and told the other professor his theory was stupid.

This same professor told me to throw rocks to scare the “stupid fucking crabs” into moving so we could count them properly.

SCIENCE

thank you

this is one of the best comments this post has recieved

I have witnessed:

Two professors hiding around a corner and snickering, “Shhh, here she comes!” While a female professor approached and, when she finally found them, she proceeded to scream while pointing from one to the other, “You! I called your office but you weren’t there! So I tried to call YOUR office to figure out where HE was but YOU weren’t there!”

Two grad students standing outside a closed and locked door yelling, “Come out of the damn office. You haven’t left for days. If you didn’t have a couch in there I’d be concerned as to where you were sleeping!”

A religious studies professor apologizing for being late to class because, “security stopped me because I’m dressed like a hobbit”

Watched a professor snort the results of my experiment to determine if I had the right final compound.

Two archeology professors toss priceless fossilized teeth back and forth in an attempt to figure out who is smarter by “guessing the type of tooth and species of animal before it lands”

Multiple fully degreed individuals throw dry ice at one another in an attempt to be first to use the lab/get that piece of equipment/or change the iPod song.

A genetics professor build furniture out of stacks of paper and planks of wood because she is that far behind in grading papers/responding. One of the impromptu furniture pieces housed a fish tank.

I could go on but I think that covers the larger portion of the insanity…

Every time it comes around on my dash, it gets better.

(via theflatlime)

cosplayingwhileblack:

Character: Ryuko Matoi

Series: Kill La Kill

Cosplayer: X

SUBMISSION

blackdiamondmedia:

ILLUMINATION F/W Collection Lookbook by ENID

(via aatropos)

design-is-fine:

Friedrich Tiedemann, Tabulae arteriarum corporis humani, 1822. Depictions of the artery system in the human body. Abbildungen der Pulsadern des menschlichen Körpers. Complete PDF online: University Library Heidelberg

(via dangerslut)